IndexCalendarMAN/FAQSoekLedelysGebruikersgroepeRegistreerTeken in
Neem asb kennis dat hiermee dit amptelik aangekondig word dat die KVB Forum sal skuif, gaan na die kaapsevryheidsburgers.org blad en volg die Forum skakel
Latest topics
» BYMEKAARKOM DAG
Sat Sep 25, 2010 4:28 pm by findmy012

» WAARSKUWINGS VLAKKE TOV SEKURITEITS STATUS
Sat Sep 25, 2010 4:27 pm by findmy012

» VROU IN HUIS VERWURG DEUR SWART ROWERS
Sat Sep 25, 2010 4:27 pm by findmy012

» FORUM WILL BE CLOSING!!!!!!
Sun Sep 05, 2010 9:38 pm by KVB000000002

» ANC GEORGANISEERDE MISDAAD SINDIKAAT IN BLOU TERREUR UNIFORMS
Tue Aug 24, 2010 9:02 pm by KVB000000002

» AND RATCONTROL
Tue Aug 24, 2010 8:58 pm by KVB000000002

» N DAG IN DIE LEWE VAN N BLANKE INWONER IN N WIT PLAKKERSKAMP
Thu Aug 19, 2010 10:38 pm by KVB000021133

» STAKENDE BOBBEJAANTROP OPPAD OM LAND SE EKONOMIE TE KELDER
Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:12 pm by KVB000000002

» WAAR IS DIE POSTE?
Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:50 pm by KVB000000002

Top posters
KVB000000002
 
KVB000000001
 
KVB000000005
 
KVB000021142
 
KVB000021126
 
KVB000021133
 
Arend
 
Admin
 
Ridder Van Die Langpad
 
KVB000021107
 
Wie is Aanlyn
Daar is slegs 1 gebruiker aanlyn :: 0 Geregistreerd, 0 Versteek en 1 Gas

Geen

Meeste gebruikers ooit aanlyn was 48 op Sat Apr 23, 2011 6:16 am
Statistics
Ons het 175 geregistreerde gebruikers
Die nuutste geregistreerde gebruiker is GK63

Ons gebruikers het altesaam 3166 artikels geplaas in 1809 subjects
SA Topsites
SA Topsites
::

Share | 
 

 Land grab spreads to South Africa as mob seizes farm

Besigtig vorige onderwerp Besigtig volgende onderwerp Go down 
SkrywerBoodskap
KVB000000001
Admin


Aantal posstukke : 1130
Join date : 2010-02-07

PosOnderwerp: Land grab spreads to South Africa as mob seizes farm   Sat May 22, 2010 6:07 pm

Jonathan Clayton in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa




gSiteLife.Recommend("ExternalResource", "6101732","http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/africa/article6101732.ece");

Recommend?










div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited {
color:#06c;
}


An armed mob, angered over the slow pace of land reform benefits, has launched a Zimbabwean-style invasion of one of South Africa’s new multimillion pound showpiece agricultural reform projects, the biggest yet in value instituted by the post-apartheid government.
Government sources said a mob, armed with knives and machetes, had seized control of Forana farm in the rich farming area of Mpumalanga province over the Easter weekend after threatening and driving off local managers and staff employed by the new owners, a black-run farming cooperative.
The 3,200 hectare farm is part of Tenbosch estate, a R10 billion (£740 million) land-restitution project. It is made up of several farms handed back to four local communities who, since 1923, progressively lost their historic land.
Invaders, mirroring complaints in rural communities across the country, are angry over the few benefits they have seen from the much-heralded land transfer although the new owners made clear it would take several years to turn around land that although originally seized from locals, has been abandoned and neglected for years.



function slideshowPopUp(url)
{
pictureGalleryPopupPic(url);
return false;
}


Related Links




  • Stop your racist land grab, tribunal tells Robert Mugabe








Agribusiness Umlimi, which controls the joint-venture farm management company Makhombo for the Lugedlane community, condemned the action as irresponsible and said that it compromised farming operations and jeopardised the ultimate flow of benefits to the community.
Fifteen years after the end of apartheid, land reform remains one of the country’s most sensitive issues. Government attempts to redress an imbalance that saw whites holding 83 per cent of all land, have largely failed, angering all sides.
Critics say the programme has simply contributed to destroying viable commercial farming sector by drastically reducing the amount of land available for commercial agriculture without bringing any benefit to rural communities.
“I would say that 95 per cent of land transferred under the scheme so far has simply resulted in once productive farms being turned over to subsistence farming,” Chris van Zyl, deputy general manager of the Transvaal Agricultural Union, told The Times.
He said the situation had not been helped because the new owners were frequently denied title deeds without which they found it difficult to raise the necessary investment. In addition, white farmers who are keen to sell sometimes have to wait more than two years to receive promised funds from the Government. In the meantime they make no investment on the land.
The land bank that organises such purchases under the current “willing buyer, willing seller” scheme is bankrupt after successive corruption scandals.
“All this has led to a decrease in production and a crisis of food security,” Mr van Zyl added. “You can’t just take land away from one group and hand it to others and expect it to stay productive. The issue is far more complex. Unfortunately it is a very sensitive issue and needs to be handled with care but politicians take advantage of that and whip up expectations that cannot be met.” Emotions are running high in South Africa as the country is in the midst of the most closely contested election campaign since democracy in 1994. Opposition parties are highlighting the failure of the ruling ANC to deliver on previous pledges to end poverty and improve life for the black majority - 85 per cent of the population.
Land, land reform and agricultural production are some of the areas where the Government has failed most dramatically to the extent it recently warned black farmers that they risked losing the land again under a new “use it or lose it” policy.
Farm invasions stoke fears that South Africa could go the same way as Zimbabwe where a “fast-track” programme, aimed at meeting local people’s frustrations, saw white farmers losing their farms violently - without compensation - with disastrous consequences for the broader economy.
Richard Spoor, an attorney who acted for a group of concerned members of the Tenbosch beneficiary community, told the Business Day newspaper that the Tenbosch project was a shambles because certain of the new trustees had abused the trust of the community.
Through Makhombo, Umlimi has disbursed hundreds of thousands of pounds to the Lugedlane community in the past three years, but none of the income was passed on to the community, according to the group behind the “invasion”.

Hierdie het alreeds in 2009 gebeur
Terug na bo Go down
Sien gebruiker's profiel
KVB000000002
Admin


Aantal posstukke : 1253
Join date : 2010-02-07

PosOnderwerp: Re: Land grab spreads to South Africa as mob seizes farm   Mon May 24, 2010 10:19 pm

KVB000000001 skryf:
Jonathan Clayton in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa




gSiteLife.Recommend("ExternalResource", "6101732","http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/africa/article6101732.ece");

Recommend?



Ja Swaer-

Dis houtkop. Hy sal NOOIT die term "boer" verstaan nie....is 'n wiman se ding. Die enigste wat die goed kan doen- is om op 'n wyfie sprinkaan te "Boer"- en om die hut agter die son aan te trek met 'n blik skud-skud!!






div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited {
color:#06c;
}


An armed mob, angered over the slow pace of land reform benefits, has launched a Zimbabwean-style invasion of one of South Africa’s new multimillion pound showpiece agricultural reform projects, the biggest yet in value instituted by the post-apartheid government.
Government sources said a mob, armed with knives and machetes, had seized control of Forana farm in the rich farming area of Mpumalanga province over the Easter weekend after threatening and driving off local managers and staff employed by the new owners, a black-run farming cooperative.
The 3,200 hectare farm is part of Tenbosch estate, a R10 billion (£740 million) land-restitution project. It is made up of several farms handed back to four local communities who, since 1923, progressively lost their historic land.
Invaders, mirroring complaints in rural communities across the country, are angry over the few benefits they have seen from the much-heralded land transfer although the new owners made clear it would take several years to turn around land that although originally seized from locals, has been abandoned and neglected for years.



function slideshowPopUp(url)
{
pictureGalleryPopupPic(url);
return false;
}


Related Links




  • Stop your racist land grab, tribunal tells Robert Mugabe








Agribusiness Umlimi, which controls the joint-venture farm management company Makhombo for the Lugedlane community, condemned the action as irresponsible and said that it compromised farming operations and jeopardised the ultimate flow of benefits to the community.
Fifteen years after the end of apartheid, land reform remains one of the country’s most sensitive issues. Government attempts to redress an imbalance that saw whites holding 83 per cent of all land, have largely failed, angering all sides.
Critics say the programme has simply contributed to destroying viable commercial farming sector by drastically reducing the amount of land available for commercial agriculture without bringing any benefit to rural communities.
“I would say that 95 per cent of land transferred under the scheme so far has simply resulted in once productive farms being turned over to subsistence farming,” Chris van Zyl, deputy general manager of the Transvaal Agricultural Union, told The Times.
He said the situation had not been helped because the new owners were frequently denied title deeds without which they found it difficult to raise the necessary investment. In addition, white farmers who are keen to sell sometimes have to wait more than two years to receive promised funds from the Government. In the meantime they make no investment on the land.
The land bank that organises such purchases under the current “willing buyer, willing seller” scheme is bankrupt after successive corruption scandals.
“All this has led to a decrease in production and a crisis of food security,” Mr van Zyl added. “You can’t just take land away from one group and hand it to others and expect it to stay productive. The issue is far more complex. Unfortunately it is a very sensitive issue and needs to be handled with care but politicians take advantage of that and whip up expectations that cannot be met.” Emotions are running high in South Africa as the country is in the midst of the most closely contested election campaign since democracy in 1994. Opposition parties are highlighting the failure of the ruling ANC to deliver on previous pledges to end poverty and improve life for the black majority - 85 per cent of the population.
Land, land reform and agricultural production are some of the areas where the Government has failed most dramatically to the extent it recently warned black farmers that they risked losing the land again under a new “use it or lose it” policy.
Farm invasions stoke fears that South Africa could go the same way as Zimbabwe where a “fast-track” programme, aimed at meeting local people’s frustrations, saw white farmers losing their farms violently - without compensation - with disastrous consequences for the broader economy.
Richard Spoor, an attorney who acted for a group of concerned members of the Tenbosch beneficiary community, told the Business Day newspaper that the Tenbosch project was a shambles because certain of the new trustees had abused the trust of the community.
Through Makhombo, Umlimi has disbursed hundreds of thousands of pounds to the Lugedlane community in the past three years, but none of the income was passed on to the community, according to the group behind the “invasion”.

Hierdie het alreeds in 2009 gebeur
Terug na bo Go down
Sien gebruiker's profiel
 
Land grab spreads to South Africa as mob seizes farm
Besigtig vorige onderwerp Besigtig volgende onderwerp Terug na bo 
Bladsy 1 van 1

Permissions in this forum:Jy mag nie onderwerpe in hierdie forum beantwoord nie.
 :: Aanval op ons mense / Attack on our people-
Spring na: